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Tuesday, 11/12

Air date 11/12/13
Segment 1:
 
A military contractor is expanding its Mississippi operations and adding 150 new jobs. Raytheon is expanding its plant in Forest where it builds military radars. The additional jobs will bring the plant to around 850 employees at Raytheon. The plant is expanding with the assistance of 8-million dollars in state money, mostly for workforce training and improvements of near by infrastructure.  Plant manager Bob Hildebrand says the company is expecting growth in the airborne radar and electronic warfare markets.  Hildebrand spoke with MPB's Jeffrey Hess.
 
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Segment 2:
 
As part of an international summit on clean-energy projects, state and federal officials joined foreign dignitaries from around the world on a tour of Mississippi's Kemper County Coal Plant, U-S Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz says the clean-coal technology being created by the Kemper County Project will be integral to the success of the nation's future energy policy.
 
The Kemper project has not been without controversy. Since the construction of the plant began in 2010, the project's budget has more than doubled. Going from two billion to nearly five billion dollars, and critics of the plant worry that Mississippi Power -- the company that owns the plant -- will pass a majority of the costs to its customers, who have already seen a 15% increase in their rates.
 
Barbara Correro is one Kemper County resident that does not like the new plant.  She walked along her property with MPB's Paul Boger - property she originally visited as a girl when it belonged to her grandparents.
 
Jeff Shepard is spokesman for Mississippi Power.  He said the cost overruns associated with the plant are reasonable, because so much of the building process was unknown when construction began.
 
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Segment 3:
 
Workplace101
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Segment 4:
 
In November of 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas. Fifty years later, a panel of veteran journalists debated JFK’s lasting impact. The panel was held at the University of Mississippi's Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics.  Our Sandra Knispel spoke with one of the panelists, and the Center's chairman, Charles Overby.


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