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Miss. Branch of Salvation Army Offering Help to Oklahoma Tornado Victims

By Lawayne Childrey | Published 21 May 2013 04:12pm | comments
Members of the Mississippi Salvation Army are activating disaster response teams and mobile feeding units to help residents in tornado ravaged Moore, Oklahoma. The organization is making efforts  to respond and they're asking for assistance from the public. 
 
To donate to the Salvation Army's efforts visit SalvationArmyUSA.org
 
Hours after a mile wide tornado left a trail of destruction through Moore Oklahoma Monday, members of the Mississippi Salvation Army had already deployed five feeding units for victims and responders in the storm battered area. 
 
During a Tuesday morning teleconference members of the Salvation Army's Southeastern  Division met to determine what additional support is critically needed in the area. Communications Director, Mark Jones says one of their top priorities is spiritual and emotional support.
 
"Because right now, people have lost their lives, they've lost their homes, they're worried, they don't understand where the next meal may even come from, they don't understand if their job is going to remain because their place of business was destroyed so emotional and spiritual care teams are going to be a vital part of the Salvation Army's response in Oklahoma," says Jones. 
 
While the Mississippi organization has not yet been asked to provide additional manpower, Jones says they are soliciting much needed cash donations.
  
"In-kind  gifts are hard to palatize, and sort in the midst of trying to respond to meet the immediate basic, life-sustaining needs, a $10 gift to the Salvation Army will feed an individual for four meals and it includes deploying those resources into these areas as well as the food costs itself, so by buying in bulk, we can maximize the service we give to people in their point of need," continues Jones.
 
That sentiment is being echoed by Salvation Army's Disaster Services Director, Thad Hicks.
 
"they are inundated with all kinds of food items and water items and stuff like that but that's hard to get from point A to point B often times and they have to find a place to keep it there and if you've seen the media coverage, there's not a lot of places there that they could potentially store this stuff, money is very easy to transport around and whatever the need is at the time, they can use that to get it," says Hicks.
 
 
 
 
 

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