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Healthcare Providers are Being Trained in Jackson to Better Educate the Public about Diabetes

By Lawayne Childrey | Published 09 Mar 2011 01:13pm | comments
Dozens of healthcare providers are in Jackson this week learning how to better educate the public about diabetes

Nearly 300 thousand Mississippians have type 2 diabetes, an incurable disease that affects the way the body uses food. MPB's Lawayne Childrey reports how healthcare providers are being trained in Jackson this week to better educate the public on this potentially deadly disease.

Diabetes contributes to the deaths of nearly 800 Mississippians every year. That's why Glenda Oden, a registered dietician from Clarksdale says she is thankful to be alive.

"I lost 35 pounds in a month. Only thing I wanted to eat or drink was tomato juice and all I did was sleep. I missed work one morning, I over slept. Phone had been ringing, people had been knocking at the door and I didn't hear it. I got up and went to the doctor and that's when they discovered it."

Over time uncontrolled diabetes can lead to increases in blood sugars. That can lead to complications such as heart disease, stroke, blindness even amputations. Glendora Singleton is Director of Nursing for Jackson Hinds Comprehensive Health Center. She along with other healthcare professionals, are eager to educate themselves and the public about this potentially deadly disease.

"People are so apt to be noncompliant and they don't exactly know why they are needing to take care of themselves in order to live a longer life or have a healthier life. And then we also try to give them incentives like you have grandchildren that you want to see grow up or you may have a daughter that you want to walk down the aisle for her wedding. So we try to encourage them using those type things.”

Dr Allen Herman is with Mississippi Health First. He says It is estimated that diabetes cost the state millions of dollars annually and that includes treatment, time lost from work and hospitalization.

"About a third of the patients in the hospital beds would have diabetes as one of their conditions and that's a really large number. You also have a much higher rate of death from heart disease and from diabetes. And heart disease deaths are influenced by diabetes. So a lot of people who have heart disease also have diabetes and they'll tend to die at an earlier age and they'll also die in larger numbers."

Experts say nearly one fourth of diabetes cases in the state go undiagnosed. Lawayne Childrey MPB News. 

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Dozens of healthcare providers are in Jackson this week learning how to better educate the public about diabetes


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